Interactive Web Content

Let your audience do more than simply look at your website

Well you can press it if you want...

What is Interactive Content?

Interactive Content for both Websites and Mobile Apps enables the viewer to engage in an informative and entertaining way with images, animation, video and sound through the use of exploration, making choices and being able to control the elements on screen for a given purpose. All of this content can be created as either HTML5 Interactive Website Features, Web Apps or Mobile Apps.

All of the interactive content I produce is web standard and will work on every mobile, tablet and large screen device without any additional plugins or viewers.

Interactive Content brings websites to life!

Interactive Content, can I have this on my website?

Absolutely, Interactive Website Features provide a very high level of engagement enabling your audience to engage and particpate with features of your website and make choices with the content on screen. This could typically be interactive virtual environments where the audience can explore and click on areas to reveal more in-depth information comprising of imagery, sound, video, 3D content and animation.

Hover over one of the spots to discover what that part of the U-Boat is. Click on a spot to learn more about that part of the U-Boat.

A submarine snorkel is a device which allows a submarine to operate submerged while still taking in air from above the surface. British Royal Navy personnel often refer to it as the snort. A concept devised by Dutch engineers, it was widely used on German U-boats during the last year of World War II and known to them as a Schnorchel

U-Boats used either kerosene or diesel engines. These engines were used to power the submarine when cruising above the waterline as well as acting as a generator to recharge the batteries for submersed power.

Batteries provided power to the submarine when submersed under the waterline. Due to exhaust fumes and the noise of engines batteries provided a silent method of movement for the submarine. The disadvantage was the limited amount of time batteries provided as the submarine would need to surface regularly in order to recharge the batteries. A U Boat could typically submerge for 2 hours at a time.

A U Boat crew typically consisted of 35 people. In order to minimise space crew would share beds on a rotational shift pattern.

The electrical bay at the rear of the U Boat controlled all of the electrical power required for the electronic components such as the lighting and the radio. In addition to this the electrical area controlled and monitored the recharging of the batteries to power the submarine.

The periscope is a hollow column with angled mirrors at each end enabling somebody to view above the water. Periscopes allow a submarine, when submerged at a relatively shallow depth, to search visually for nearby targets and threats on the surface of the water and in the air. When not in use, a submarine's periscope retracts into the hull.

The Control Room is the nerve centre of the U Boat. It is from here where the captain commands the boat. The base of the periscope is situated here.

The Deck Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the front of the submarine. The is the main form of offensive and defensive weaponry when above the submarine is surfaced. The Deck Gun is operated manually by a crew member.

The Anti-Aircraft Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the rear of the submarine. The Anti-Aircraft gun is manually operated by a crew member when the submarine is surfaced and is intended to act as a defensive measure against enemy aircraft.

The U Boat was equipped with self-propelled torpedoes and formed the main offensive purpose of the U Boat, capable of silently sinking shipping vessels. The torpedo is an underwater missile comprising of a propellor to provide the forward motion through the water. The torpedo is packed with high explosive that detonates on impact or in some cases with a timing mechanism and is capable of tearing holes in the side of a large boat.

The Radio Room is situated at the rear of the submarine and provides the base for both the sending and receiving of communication between the submarine and the mainland headquarters.

The antennas for the radio communications span the length of the submarine from the front to the back in the form of transmission cables. This in effect makes the whole of the submarine a transmission device.

What is a Web App?

Web Apps are also an exiting feature where the interactive content is compiled in to a standalone embedded object within a web page. The benefits of this are the loading times and the ability for offline use when there is no internet connection available. These can typically be exhibition display kiosks or information tablets or iPads used as an educational resource to provide information on a walk or tour of a real life environment, such as an audio and video tour guide of historical sites.

You will be able to return here with the 'Return' button on the feature page.

Search the home of the late Ichabod Davenport and search for clues in order to find the combination to unlock the wealth in his safe. This is an example of a simple virtual tour, with clues to solve.

This uses mobile responsive and bespoke interactive navigation, meaning it will scale perfectly for any mobile, tablet or large screen display.

In addition to the virtual tour the riddles and answers provide an interactive experience for the viewer to enter the unlock code based on the clues in the virtual tour. The riddles and clues are provided randomly in order to provide a different ‘treasure hunt’ each time. All of these features work with standard web browsers and do not require any ‘clunky’ media players or plugins to run.

This is a very simple concept, we can go nuts with ideas for this type of project.

This concept can be applied to many different applications on a website or interactive presentation such as virtual tours of buildings and environments or sequential informational content delivery. Every scene can be stylised as preferred and can include additional animated or interactive content, this is a fairly simple example, but can be expanded with as much detail and elements as needed.

A submarine snorkel is a device which allows a submarine to operate submerged while still taking in air from above the surface. British Royal Navy personnel often refer to it as the snort. A concept devised by Dutch engineers, it was widely used on German U-boats during the last year of World War II and known to them as a Schnorchel

U-Boats used either kerosene or diesel engines. These engines were used to power the submarine when cruising above the waterline as well as acting as a generator to recharge the batteries for submersed power.

Batteries provided power to the submarine when submersed under the waterline. Due to exhaust fumes and the noise of engines batteries provided a silent method of movement for the submarine. The disadvantage was the limited amount of time batteries provided as the submarine would need to surface regularly in order to recharge the batteries. A U Boat could typically submerge for 2 hours at a time.

A U Boat crew typically consisted of 35 people. In order to minimise space crew would share beds on a rotational shift pattern.

The electrical bay at the rear of the U Boat controlled all of the electrical power required for the electronic components such as the lighting and the radio. In addition to this the electrical area controlled and monitored the recharging of the batteries to power the submarine.

The periscope is a hollow column with angled mirrors at each end enabling somebody to view above the water. Periscopes allow a submarine, when submerged at a relatively shallow depth, to search visually for nearby targets and threats on the surface of the water and in the air. When not in use, a submarine's periscope retracts into the hull.

The Control Room is the nerve centre of the U Boat. It is from here where the captain commands the boat. The base of the periscope is situated here.

The Deck Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the front of the submarine. The is the main form of offensive and defensive weaponry when above the submarine is surfaced. The Deck Gun is operated manually by a crew member.

The Anti-Aircraft Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the rear of the submarine. The Anti-Aircraft gun is manually operated by a crew member when the submarine is surfaced and is intended to act as a defensive measure against enemy aircraft.

The U Boat was equipped with self-propelled torpedoes and formed the main offensive purpose of the U Boat, capable of silently sinking shipping vessels. The torpedo is an underwater missile comprising of a propellor to provide the forward motion through the water. The torpedo is packed with high explosive that detonates on impact or in some cases with a timing mechanism and is capable of tearing holes in the side of a large boat.

The Radio Room is situated at the rear of the submarine and provides the base for both the sending and receiving of communication between the submarine and the mainland headquarters.

The antennas for the radio communications span the length of the submarine from the front to the back in the form of transmission cables. This in effect makes the whole of the submarine a transmission device.

What about Mobile Apps, what could they be used for?

Mobile Apps for iOS and Android are fantastic as they provide offline interactive content for information and entertainment and can be easily installed on most mobile devices. Similar to a Web App this means when the Internet is unavailable (such as an isolated or low signal location) the Mobile App will still work. This is useful as a tour guide app, restaurant menus for returning customers, sports and entertainment fixtures, in fact for an almost limitless range of applications. The great thing about mobile apps is that once they are installed on a device, new or updated content will be automatically pushed to the devices when they are connected or next connect to the Internet. The Mobile Apps I create do not require App Store installation, so can be easily distributed with only a weblink. Therefore your customers can download your web app directly from your website.

You will be able to return here with the 'Return' button on the feature page.

Mystic Maud was once Scarborough’s premier clairvoyant until she was exposed as a fraud. Relive the classic days of a seaside tarot card reading from Mystic Maud.

It must be pointed out though that there are many other psychics and clairvoyants that are genuine and provide much needed guidance. Mystic Maud wasn’t one of them though.

This interactive feature utilises random elements in order to deliver the cards and accompanying narrative for the reading. Although if you have your cards dealt a few times you will notice everyone’s favourite the Death Card does appear a little more frequently.

This feature simply demonstrates how randomisation and particular rules can be used in any circumstance to provide entertainment or refreshing web content. This can be applied to many other different applications and uses on a website such as photographs, news features, advertisements and special offers.

A submarine snorkel is a device which allows a submarine to operate submerged while still taking in air from above the surface. British Royal Navy personnel often refer to it as the snort. A concept devised by Dutch engineers, it was widely used on German U-boats during the last year of World War II and known to them as a Schnorchel

U-Boats used either kerosene or diesel engines. These engines were used to power the submarine when cruising above the waterline as well as acting as a generator to recharge the batteries for submersed power.

Batteries provided power to the submarine when submersed under the waterline. Due to exhaust fumes and the noise of engines batteries provided a silent method of movement for the submarine. The disadvantage was the limited amount of time batteries provided as the submarine would need to surface regularly in order to recharge the batteries. A U Boat could typically submerge for 2 hours at a time.

A U Boat crew typically consisted of 35 people. In order to minimise space crew would share beds on a rotational shift pattern.

The electrical bay at the rear of the U Boat controlled all of the electrical power required for the electronic components such as the lighting and the radio. In addition to this the electrical area controlled and monitored the recharging of the batteries to power the submarine.

The periscope is a hollow column with angled mirrors at each end enabling somebody to view above the water. Periscopes allow a submarine, when submerged at a relatively shallow depth, to search visually for nearby targets and threats on the surface of the water and in the air. When not in use, a submarine's periscope retracts into the hull.

The Control Room is the nerve centre of the U Boat. It is from here where the captain commands the boat. The base of the periscope is situated here.

The Deck Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the front of the submarine. The is the main form of offensive and defensive weaponry when above the submarine is surfaced. The Deck Gun is operated manually by a crew member.

The Anti-Aircraft Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the rear of the submarine. The Anti-Aircraft gun is manually operated by a crew member when the submarine is surfaced and is intended to act as a defensive measure against enemy aircraft.

The U Boat was equipped with self-propelled torpedoes and formed the main offensive purpose of the U Boat, capable of silently sinking shipping vessels. The torpedo is an underwater missile comprising of a propellor to provide the forward motion through the water. The torpedo is packed with high explosive that detonates on impact or in some cases with a timing mechanism and is capable of tearing holes in the side of a large boat.

The Radio Room is situated at the rear of the submarine and provides the base for both the sending and receiving of communication between the submarine and the mainland headquarters.

The antennas for the radio communications span the length of the submarine from the front to the back in the form of transmission cables. This in effect makes the whole of the submarine a transmission device.

This content looks as though it could be useful for Educational Resources, is it?

It certainly is. Interactive content is ideal for learning as it caters for Audible, Visual and Kineasthetic Learning Style with students. I have worked within education for many years and my Masters Degree (MA) in Digital Media focussed on utilising interactive concepts in order to motivate people to engage with content through exploration, narrative, curiosity and entertainment. With interactive content it is a combination of technical skills, creative development and being able to disseminate information in a manner that meets all the Learning Styles of individuals, something that lies at the heart of education delivery.

You will be able to return here with the 'Return' button on the feature page.

Can you get the crumpled paper ball in the waste paper bin?

A ball drop game that has been cross-bred with pinball and the old tat we collect over time in the garden shed.

Tip: Use the see-saw to start the ball rolling.

This is really less of a game and more an example to show how interactive content can react with other elements. Here the ball will bounce off objects and act independently. The radioactive blocks can be moved by the viewer to wherever they want and used to nudge the ball, (but I have made them a little unpredictable in their behaviour). Likewise everything on the screen can react to a press and operate simultaneously as opposed to one thing happening at a time, the cog goes backwards, the see-saw will dip either side, have a click around and see.

This principle can be applied to a very wide range of scenarios using graphics, illustration or photographic elements, there can be interactive restaurant menus, product demonstrations and simulations, even learning materials.

This is a take on pinball, and therefore a basic game, but if you want an array of objects that move and react to other elements on a webpage or reveal and provide extra content then the principle is the same.

A submarine snorkel is a device which allows a submarine to operate submerged while still taking in air from above the surface. British Royal Navy personnel often refer to it as the snort. A concept devised by Dutch engineers, it was widely used on German U-boats during the last year of World War II and known to them as a Schnorchel

U-Boats used either kerosene or diesel engines. These engines were used to power the submarine when cruising above the waterline as well as acting as a generator to recharge the batteries for submersed power.

Batteries provided power to the submarine when submersed under the waterline. Due to exhaust fumes and the noise of engines batteries provided a silent method of movement for the submarine. The disadvantage was the limited amount of time batteries provided as the submarine would need to surface regularly in order to recharge the batteries. A U Boat could typically submerge for 2 hours at a time.

A U Boat crew typically consisted of 35 people. In order to minimise space crew would share beds on a rotational shift pattern.

The electrical bay at the rear of the U Boat controlled all of the electrical power required for the electronic components such as the lighting and the radio. In addition to this the electrical area controlled and monitored the recharging of the batteries to power the submarine.

The periscope is a hollow column with angled mirrors at each end enabling somebody to view above the water. Periscopes allow a submarine, when submerged at a relatively shallow depth, to search visually for nearby targets and threats on the surface of the water and in the air. When not in use, a submarine's periscope retracts into the hull.

The Control Room is the nerve centre of the U Boat. It is from here where the captain commands the boat. The base of the periscope is situated here.

The Deck Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the front of the submarine. The is the main form of offensive and defensive weaponry when above the submarine is surfaced. The Deck Gun is operated manually by a crew member.

The Anti-Aircraft Gun is a high calibre gun positioned at the rear of the submarine. The Anti-Aircraft gun is manually operated by a crew member when the submarine is surfaced and is intended to act as a defensive measure against enemy aircraft.

The U Boat was equipped with self-propelled torpedoes and formed the main offensive purpose of the U Boat, capable of silently sinking shipping vessels. The torpedo is an underwater missile comprising of a propellor to provide the forward motion through the water. The torpedo is packed with high explosive that detonates on impact or in some cases with a timing mechanism and is capable of tearing holes in the side of a large boat.

The Radio Room is situated at the rear of the submarine and provides the base for both the sending and receiving of communication between the submarine and the mainland headquarters.

The antennas for the radio communications span the length of the submarine from the front to the back in the form of transmission cables. This in effect makes the whole of the submarine a transmission device.